Beaverbrook
Experience Beaverbrook
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We have two wonderful restaurants to choose from at Beaverbrook.
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GIFT IDEAS

ThE BEAVERBROOK EXPERIENCE AT YOUR FINGERTIPS! For details and information on the various gift voucher ideas we have available, please contact us using the details below and we’ll be happy to help!
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A Great British Treasure – The History of Beaverbrook

Home to one of the most important men in 20th century Britain, Beaverbrook’s colourful history is as unique as it is fascinating.

Dating back to 1866, the history of Beaverbrook is inextricably linked to a number of great British characters of the last 150 years. From Winston Churchill to Rudyard Kipling, this truly magnificent estate has played host to a number of historical icons, all of whom left their mark on the Estate.

However, it’s most famous permanent resident and namesake of the estate, Max Aitken, 1st Baron Beaverbrook was a major figure in British society during the first half of the 20th century.

A Canadian by birth, Beaverbrook moved to Britain permanently in 1910 and fast became one of the most adept businessmen in the country.

His influence on politics came to fruition during World War II, when long-time friend and then Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill, asked Beaverbrook to become Minister of Aircraft Production.

Throughout his life, Beaverbrook was one of the most alluring figures in British society and his home became a base for many meetings and events with high profile friends and acquaintances.